• Vol. 40 No. 7, 308–314
  • 15 July 2011

Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Vascular Interventional Radiology Procedures: Early Experience

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ABSTRACT

Introduction: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new technological innovation that utilises flat-panel detector technology to obtain CT-like images. The key strength of a CBCT system is that cross-sectional imaging can be obtained using the angiographic flat panel unit without having to move the patient, allowing the radiologist to obtain soft tissue imaging during the procedure. This allows treatment planning, guidance, and assessment of outcome to be performed in one interventional suite.

Materials and Methods: From December 2008 to June 2009, 24 CBCT scans were performed during vascular interventional procedures on our department’s newly installed multi-axis flat panel angiographic unit.

Results: Ten cases were performed for hepatic trans-arterial chemoembolisation, 9 cases for hepatic arterial Yttrium-90 infusion, while 5 cases were for other indications. CBCT was found to be useful in 20 of the 24 cases.

Conclusion: Our early experience showed that CBCT was useful in impacting decisions during selected vascular interventional procedures. As CBCT technology improves, we can foresee wider applications of this technology.


Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new technological innovation which utilises flat-panel detector technology to obtain CT-like axial images. The radiation source beam and flat panel detector are coupled together by a C-arm. In a single 180-degree rotation of the C-arm (Fig. 1), a typical CBCT unit is able to acquire a volumetric dataset of approximately 25 cm (diameter) x 18 cm (thickness), the exact volume of which varies depending on the machine. Both the radiation source and the detector are part of the angiographic unit that is used for acquiring fluoroscopic and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images during an interventional radiology procedure.

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