• Vol. 47 No. 8
  • 15 August 2018

Performance of the Paediatric Index of Mortality 3 and Paediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction 2 Scores in Critically Ill Children

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ABSTRACT

The Paediatric Index of Mortality 3 (PIM 3) and Paediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction 2 (PELOD 2) scores were recently revised. We aimed to assess the performance of these scores in a contemporary cohort of critically ill children. Materials and Methods: This is a single-centre prospective study conducted in a multidisciplinary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Consecutive PICU admissions over 1 year were included and admission PIM 3 and PELOD 2 scores were calculated. The performance of each of the scores was evaluated by calculating the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test for the outcome of PICU mortality. Results: A total of 570 patient admissions were eligible for this study. The median age of patients was 3.1 (interquartile range [IQR]: 0.4, 8.9 years). Overall median PIM 3 and PELOD 2 scores were 1.2 (IQR: 0.4, 3.2) % and 4 (IQR: 2, 7), respectively. The overall mortality rate was 35/570 (6.1%). The PIM 3 and PELOD 2 scores had good discrimination for mortality (AUCs 0.88 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85, 0.91] and 0.86 [95% CI 0.83, 0.89], respectively). Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory for both scores. Higher PIM 3 and PELOD 2 scores were also associated with decreasing ventilator and PICU-free days. Conclusion: PIM 3 and PELOD 2 scores are robust severity of illness scores that are generalisable to a contemporary cohort of critically ill children in Singapore.


Initially designed to provide an indication of the risk of death in certain subsets of critically ill patients, the use of severity of illness scores in critically ill patients has evolved and these scores are now more often used to internally and externally benchmark quality of intensive care, and as markers of severity of illness for analysis in clinical studies.

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