• Vol. 34 No. 6, 163C–165C
  • 15 July 2005

The NUS MBBS-PhD Programme: Nurturing Clinician-Scientists for Tomorrow

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ABSTRACT

The MBBS-PhD programme is a significant milestone in medical education in Singapore. In July 2000, the Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore launched this programme in collaboration with the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, with support from the Economic Development Board, and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore. The objectives of the programme are to nurture and develop the talents of the brightest medical students by integrating clinical and basic biomedical research training, as well as to stimulate advanced basic and applied research in areas of growing importance to clinical medicine. The programme also aims to train clinician-scientists who will interface basic biology and clinical practice to solve biomedical problems and spearhead biomedical research initiatives in Singapore. Successful MBBS-PhD graduates can pursue career tracks in clinical research, basic biomedical research or in the biotechnology industry.


The MBBS-PhD programme is a significant milestone in medical education in Singapore. In July 2000, the Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore (NUS) launched this programme in collaboration with the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), with support from the Economic Development Board (EDB), and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). The major impetus for initiating the programme is the recognition that clinician-scientists have important roles to play in biomedical research and training. Clinician-scientists have unique and integrated perspectives arising from their dual understanding of disease processes and basic biology. These perspectives are critical in directing translational research and teaching activities in the investigation and solution of biomedical problems in Singapore as it aspires to be a world-class hub for biomedical research and healthcare. In view of the nature of their work and training, clinician-scientists have better access to both clinical and basic science research materials, and to collaborative networks.

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