• Vol. 39 No. 5, 404–411
  • 15 May 2010

Childhood Food Allergy: A Singaporean Perspective

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ABSTRACT

Food allergy is defined as reaction to a food which has an immunologic mechanism. Its prevalence is increasing in children globally and is therefore of increasing clinical importance. A useful clinical approach is to distinguish food allergic reactions by the timing of clinical reaction in relation to food exposure and classified as immediate (generally IgE-mediated) and delayed (generally non-IgE-mediated), with the exception of eczema and eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease, which, when associated with food allergy may be associated with either mechanism. This review is aimed at providing the clinician with a Singaporean perspective on the clinical approach and management of these disorders.


Food allergy is defined as reaction to a food which has an immunologic mechanism. If immunoglobulin E (IgE) is involved in the reaction, the term IgE-mediated food allergy is appropriate.

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